607 for Beginners


“There is nothing to fear by making this test, by proving our beliefs by the only standard for judging religious teachings—the Holy Bible.”
The Watchtower, 15 April 1960, page 229.

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Jehovah’s Witnesses claim that the Bible refers to seventy years of Jewish exile, from 607 BCE until 537 BCE, and that a special period ran from 607 BCE until 1914 CE. Their beliefs about 1914, the ‘last days’, and their ‘faithful slave class’ are all dependent on 607 BCE. But what does the Bible really teach?*
*Verses herein are considered from their contextual perspective, however the information is valid whether or not the prophecies were made in advance. It is likely that the accounts were actually historical records written (or edited) after the events, presented in the context of ‘prophecy’ as a literary device. Some outcomes could also be reasonably predicted based on the political climate at the time. See also What Does the Bible Really Teach… about Babylon’s 70 years? (PDF), What Does the Bible Really Teach… about Daniel’s 70 weeks? (PDF) and What Does the Bible Really Teach… about the Gentile Times? (PDF).

Who would serve Babylon for 70 years?

All the surrounding nations would serve Babylon for seventy years.
70_years

  • Jeremiah 25:9–11: here I am sending and I will take all the families of the north,” is the utterance of Jehovah, “even [sending] to Nebuchadrezzar the king of Babylon, my servant, and I will bring them against this land and against its inhabitants and against all these nations round about; and I will devote them to destruction and make them an object of astonishment and something to whistle at and places devastated to time indefinite. 10 And I will destroy out of them the sound of exultation and the sound of rejoicing, the voice of the bridegroom and the voice of the bride, the sound of the hand mill and the light of the lamp. 11 And all this land must become a devastated place, an object of astonishment, and these nations will have to serve the king of Babylon seventy years.”’
  • Jeremiah 27:6–7: And now I myself have given all these lands into the hand of Nebuchadnezzar the king of Babylon, my servant; and even the wild beasts of the field I have given him to serve him. 7 And all the nations must serve even him and his son and his grandson until the time even of his own land comes, and many nations and great kings must exploit him as a servant.’
  • Isaiah’s Prophecy—Light for All Mankind, volume 1, chap. 19 p. 253: Jehovah, through Jeremiah, includes Tyre among the nations that will be singled out to drink the wine of His rage. He says: “These nations will have to serve the king of Babylon seventy years.” (Jeremiah 25:8–17, 22, 27) True, the island-city of Tyre is not subject to Babylon for a full 70 years, since the Babylonian Empire falls in 539 B.C.E. Evidently, the 70 years represents the period of Babylonia’s greatest domination—when the Babylonian royal dynasty boasts of having lifted its throne even above “the stars of God.” (Isaiah 14:13) Different nations come under that domination at different times. But at the end of 70 years, that domination will crumble.

Does serving Babylon mean exile?

No. Exile was a punishment for nations that refused to serve Babylon. Nations could serve Babylon in their own land. After most of the Jews had been exiled, Jeremiah said that those still in Jerusalem should serve Babylon to avoid exile. Even after Jerusalem was destroyed, Gedaliah told the Jews still in Judea to continue dwelling in their land by serving the king of Babylon. The ‘wild beasts’ were included under Babylonian’s dominion but were not exiled.

  • Jeremiah 27:6–11: And now I myself have given all these lands into the hand of Neb·u·chad·nez′zar the king of Babylon, my servant; and even the wild beasts of the field I have given him to serve him. 7 And all the nations must serve even him and his son and his grandson until the time even of his own land comes, and many nations and great kings must exploit him as a servant.’ 8 “‘“‘And it must occur that the nation and the kingdom that will not serve him, even Neb·u·chad·nez′zar the king of Babylon; and the one that will not put its neck under the yoke of the king of Babylon, with the sword and with the famine and with the pestilence I shall turn my attention upon that nation,’ is the utterance of Jehovah, ‘until I shall have finished them off by his hand.’ 9 “‘“‘And as for YOU men, do not listen to YOUR prophets and to YOUR practicers of divination and to YOUR dreamers and to YOUR practicers of magic and to YOUR sorcerers, who are saying to YOU: “YOU men will not serve the king of Babylon.” 10 For falsehood is what they are prophesying to YOU, for the purpose of having YOU taken far away from off YOUR ground; and I shall have to disperse YOU, and YOU will have to perish. 11 “‘“‘And as for the nation that will bring its neck under the yoke of the king of Babylon and actually serve him, I will also let it rest upon its ground,’ is the utterance of Jehovah, ‘and it will certainly cultivate it and dwell in it.’”’”
  • Jeremiah 27:17: Do not listen to them. Serve the king of Babylon and keep on living. Why should this city become a devastated place?
  • 2 Kings 25:22,24: As for the people left behind in the land of Judah, whom Neb·u·chad·nez′zar the king of Babylon had left behind, he now appointed over them Ged·a·li′ah the son of A·hi′kam the son of Sha′phan. … 24 Then Ged·a·li′ah swore to them and their men and said to them: “Do not be afraid of [being] servants to the Chal·de′ans. Dwell in the land and serve the king of Babylon, and it will go well with YOU.”
  • Jeremiah 40:9, 10: And Ged·a·li′ah the son of A·hi′kam the son of Sha′phan proceeded to swear to them and to their men, saying: “Do not be afraid of serving the Chal·de′ans. Continue dwelling in the land and serve the king of Babylon, and it will go well with YOU. 10 And as for me, here I am dwelling in Miz′pah, in order to stand before the Chal·de′ans who will come to us. And as for YOU yourselves, gather wine and summer fruits and oil and put [them] in YOUR vessels and dwell in YOUR cities that YOU have seized.”

Does Daniel 1:1 refer to the third year of Jehoiakim’s reign, or as a vassal to Nebuchadnezzar?

Daniel 1:1 refers to Jehoiakim’s third year as king. The word translated “kingship” (malkuwth, Strong’s H4438) means “reign” and is not a special term implying vassalage.

  • Daniel 1:1: In the third year of the kingship of Jehoiakim the king of Judah, Nebuchadnezzar the king of Babylon came to Jerusalem and proceeded to lay siege to it.
  • Daniel 1:1 (KJV, ASV, Darby, ERV): In the third year of the reign of Jehoiakim king of Judah came Nebuchadnezzar king of Babylon unto Jerusalem, and besieged it.
  • Daniel 1:1 (NIV, ESV, NAS): In the third year of the reign of Jehoiakim king of Judah, Nebuchadnezzar king of Babylon came to Jerusalem and besieged it.
  • Daniel 1:1 (Webster, WEB, AKJV): In the third year of the reign of Jehoiakim king of Judah came Nebuchadnezzar king of Babylon to Jerusalem, and besieged it.
  • Daniel 1:1 (Douay-Rheims): In the third year of the reign of Joakim king of Juda, Nabuchodonosor king of Babylon came to Jerusalem, and besieged it.
  • Daniel 1:1 (YLT): In the third year of the reign of Jehoiakim king of Judah, come hath Nebuchadnezzar king of Babylon to Jerusalem, and layeth siege against it;
  • Strong’s Exhaustive Concordance of the Bible: H4438—malkuwth
    Definition: 1. royalty, royal power, reign, kingdom, sovereign power
    • royal power, dominion
    • reign
    • kingdom, realm

Is there a discrepancy between Jeremiah 25:1 and Daniel 1:1 without defining ‘kingship’ as ‘vassalage’?

No. Both verses refer to the same year. Jeremiah considers Jehoiakim’s accession period to be his first regnal year. Daniel, educated in Babylon,* employed the Babylonian custom wherein the first regnal year follows the accession period. Jeremiah 25:1 is set in Elul (August/September) 605 BCE, several months prior to Daniel 1:1. Babylonian chronicles confirm Nebuchadnezzar’s presence in the Hatti-region in Sebat (January/February) 604 BCE (the new year began in Nisan [March/April]), and also state that the Hatti-region included Jerusalem.
*The historicity of Daniel is disputed. However, the book of Daniel is written from a Babylonian perspective regardless of authenticity.

  • Jeremiah 25:1: The word that occurred to Jeremiah concerning all the people of Judah in the fourth year of Jehoiakim the son of Josiah, the king of Judah, that is, the first year of Nebuchadrezzar the king of Babylon;
  • Daniel 1:1: In the third year of the kingship of Jehoiakim the king of Judah, Nebuchadnezzar the king of Babylon came to Jerusalem and proceeded to lay siege to it.
  • BM21946, rows 12–13: In the accession year Nebuchadnezzar went back again to the Hatti-land and until the month of Sebat marched unopposed through the Hatti-land; in the month of Sebat he took the heavy tribute of the Hatti-territory to Babylon.
  • The Watchtower, 1 February 1969, p. 88: In harmony with this a cuneiform inscription of the Babylonian Chronicle states: “… the king of Akkad [Nebuchadnezzar] mustered his troops, marched to Hatti-land [Syria-Palestine], and encamped against the city of Judah.

Can Jeremiah 27:6 refer to Nebuchadnezzar as king while he was still prince?

It can (but it does not have to). Nebuchadnezzar can be referred to as a king while he was actually prince, in the same manner that prince Belshazzar is referred to as king. The Bible does not mention either of their fathers, Nabopolassar or Nabonidus. Though Jeremiah 27:7 only refers to “[Nebuchadnezzar] and his son and his grandson”, there were actually seven Babylonian rulers during the seventy years. (Additionally, the overall context of Jeremiah chapter 27 indicates that it was written later than the reign of Jehoiakim when Nebuchadnezzar was already king.)

  • Jeremiah 27:1, 6–7: In the beginning of the kingdom of Jehoiakim the son of Josiah, the king of Judah, this word occurred to Jeremiah from Jehovah, saying: … And now I myself have given all these lands into the hand of Nebuchadnezzar the king of Babylon, my servant; and even the wild beasts of the field I have given him to serve him. 7 And all the nations must serve even him and his son and his grandson until the time even of his own land comes, and many nations and great kings must exploit him as a servant.’
  • Pay Attention to Daniel’s Prophecy, chap. 3 p. 32 par. 4: Nebuchadnezzar was not yet “the king of Babylon” but was the crown prince.
  • Daniel 5:1: As regards Belshazzar the king, he made a big feast for a thousand of his grandees, and in front of the thousand he was drinking wine.
  • The Watchtower, 1 February 1986, p. 27: Belshazzar—Crown Prince or King? … So there was a Belshazzar in Babylon! Since 1854, many other inscriptions have been found to confirm this. However, none of those inscriptions call Belshazzar king. They refer to him as the king’s son or as crown prince.
  • The Watchtower, 15 September 1998, p. 9: So it would not be unprecedented for Belshazzar to be called crown prince in the official Babylonian inscriptions while being called king in the Aramaic writing of Daniel.
  • Insight on the Scriptures, volume 2, p. 480: [Belshazzar] acted as king, his father’s agent, although he may not have been legally king. The precise distinction would have been irrelevant and confusing in the story as related in Daniel.
  • Insight on the Scriptures, volume 1, p. 425: Particularly was this domination manifest during the seventh and sixth centuries B.C.E. when Nabopolassar, a native of Chaldea, and his successors, Nebuchadnezzar II, Evil-merodach (Awil-Marduk), Neriglissar, Labashi-Marduk, Nabonidus, and Belshazzar, ruled the Third World Power, Babylon.

Did the Jews equate the beginning of their exile with Jerusalem’s destruction?

No. Most of the exiles were taken about eleven years prior to Jerusalem’s destruction. jerusalem_fall

  • Ezekiel 33:21: At length it occurred in the twelfth year, in the tenth [month], on the fifth day of the month of our exile, that there came to me the escaped one from Jerusalem, saying: “The city has been struck down!”
  • Ezekiel 40:1: In the twenty-fifth year of our exile, in the start of the year, on the tenth [day] of the month, in the fourteenth year after the city had been struck down,
  • 2 Kings 24:14–16: And he took into exile all Jerusalem and all the princes and all the valiant, mighty men—ten thousand he was taking into exile—and also every craftsman and builder of bulwarks. No one had been left behind except the lowly class of the people of the land. 15Thus he took Je·hoi′a·chin into exile to Babylon; and the king’s mother and the king’s wives and his court officials and the foremost men of the land he led away as exiled people from Jerusalem to Babylon. 16 As for all the valiant men, seven thousand, and the craftsmen and the builders of bulwarks, a thousand, all the mighty men carrying on war, the king of Babylon proceeded to bring them as exiled people to Babylon.
  • Jeremiah 52:28–30: These are the people whom Nebuchadrezzar took into exile: in the seventh year, three thousand and twenty-three Jews. 29 In the eighteenth year of Nebuchadrezzar, from Jerusalem there were eight hundred and thirty-two souls. 30 In the twenty-third year of Nebuchadrezzar, Nebuzaradan the chief of the bodyguard took Jews into exile, seven hundred and forty-five souls. All the souls were four thousand and six hundred.

When was the calamity of Jeremiah 25:29?

The calamity for Jerusalem began in 605 BCE with a siege on Jerusalem by Nebuchadnezzar. Jehoiakim averted the siege by paying a tribute, and continued to do so for three full years, but refused in early 600 BCE (prior to Nisan), leading to another siege in late 598 BCE, Jewish exile in early 597 BCE, and Jerusalem’s eventual destruction in 587 BCE.* Other nations experienced calamity at different times. Despite the rendering in the New World Translation, Jeremiah 25:29 indicates that the calamity for Jerusalem was beginning (the verb chalal, Strong’s H2490#), not that the calamity would happen to Jerusalem first (an adverb, which would be ri’shown, Strong’s H7223) at some future time. Calamity at the hands of Babylon befell Assyria (and to some extent, Egypt) in 609 BCE (629 BCE in JW chronology), several years before the start of Jerusalem’s calamity and more than two decades prior to Jerusalem’s destruction. The Bible never suggests that Babylon’s 70 years begins with the calamity.
* For verses pertaining to the events in 597–598 BCE and 587 BCE, see the sections Did the Jews equate the beginning of their exile with Jerusalem’s destruction? and When was Jerusalem destroyed?
# Chalal has additional meanings of to profane or to pierce, which are not relevant to the context of Jeremiah 25:29 and not supportive of adverbial usage.

  • Jeremiah 1:14: At this Jehovah said to me: “Out of the north the calamity will be loosened against all the inhabitants of the land.
  • Jeremiah 21:10: “‘“For I have set my face against this city for calamity and not for good,” is the utterance of Jehovah. “Into the hand of the king of Babylon it will be given, and he will certainly burn it with fire.”
  • Jeremiah 25:1: The word that occurred to Jeremiah concerning all the people of Judah in the fourth year of Je·hoiʹa·kim the son of Jo·siʹah, the king of Judah, that is, the first year of Neb·u·chad·rezʹzar the king of Babylon;
  • Jeremiah 25:29: For, look! it is upon the city upon which my name is called that I am starting off in bringing calamity, and should YOU yourselves in any way go free of punishment?”’ “‘YOU will not go free of punishment, for there is a sword that I am calling against all the inhabitants of the earth,’ is the utterance of Jehovah of armies.
  • Jeremiah 25:29a (NWT, 2013 revision): For look! if I am bringing calamity first on the city that bears my name, should you go unpunished?”’
  • Jeremiah 25:29a (KJV): For, lo, I begin to bring evil on the city which is called by my name, and should ye be utterly unpunished?
  • Jeremiah 25:29a (NIV): See, I am beginning to bring disaster on the city that bears my Name, and will you indeed go unpunished?
  • Jeremiah 25:32: “This is what Jehovah of armies has said, ‘Look! A calamity is going forth from nation to nation, and a great tempest itself will be roused up from the remotest parts of the earth.
  • Daniel 1:1: In the third year of the kingship of Je·hoiʹa·kim the king of Judah, Neb·u·chad·nezʹzar the king of Babylon came to Jerusalem and proceeded to lay siege to it.
  • Daniel 1:1 (NIV, ESV, NAS): In the third year of the reign of Jehoiakim king of Judah, Nebuchadnezzar king of Babylon came to Jerusalem and besieged it.
  • 2 Kings 24:1: In his days Neb·u·chad·nezʹzar the king of Babylon came up, and so Je·hoiʹa·kim became his servant for three years. However, he turned back and rebelled against him.
  • Insight on the Scriptures, volume 1, p. 205: The Babylonian Chronicle B.M. (British Museum) 21901 recounts the fall of Nineveh … Ashur-uballit was trying to reconquer [Harran] after having been driven out. This record is in harmony with the account relative to the activity of Pharaoh Nechoh recorded at 2 Kings 23:29, which activity resulted in the death of King Josiah of Judah (c. 629 B.C.E.). This text states that “Pharaoh Nechoh the king of Egypt came up to the king of Assyria by the river Euphrates”—evidently to help him. “The king of Assyria” to whom Nechoh came may well have been Ashur-uballit II. Their campaign against Haran did not succeed. The Assyrian Empire had ended.
  • Strong’s Exhaustive Concordance of the Bible: H2490—chalal
    Definition: 1. to profane, defile, pollute, desecrate, begin
    • to begin
    • to be begun
  • Strong’s Exhaustive Concordance of the Bible: H7223—ri’shown
    Definition: 1. first, primary, former
    • former (of time)
    • foremost (of location)
    • first (in time)
    • first, chief (in degree)

What is the context of Jeremiah 29:10?

In 594 BCE (614 BCE in JW chronology), Jeremiah wrote from Jerusalem to exiles in Babylon, advising them that they would not be released until after Babylon’s seventy years had ended, in response to Hananiah’s claim that the Jews would be released from Babylon in two more years. It would make no sense to the already-exiled Jews to tell them they would be in exile for seventy years starting from an unspecified future event. After the seventy years had ended, the Jews would then repent and then attention would be given to their return to Jerusalem. It would be nonsensical to turn attention to the Jews’ return only after they had already returned.

  • Jeremiah 28:1: Then it came about in that year, in the beginning of the kingdom of Zedekiah the king of Judah, in the fourth year, in the fifth month, that Hananiah the son of Azzur, the prophet who was from Gibeon, said to me in the house of Jehovah before the eyes of the priests and of all the people:
  • The Watchtower, 15 October 1964, page 638: In the fourth year of King Zedekiah, or in 614 B.C.E., Jeremiah wrote a prophecy setting out in detail the coming fall of Babylon. It was in contrast to the prophecy made by the false prophet Hananiah to nullify the effect of Jeremiah’s prophecy against Jerusalem.
  • Jeremiah 28:11: And Hananiah went on to say before the eyes of all the people: “This is what Jehovah has said, ‘Just like this I shall break the yoke of Nebuchadnezzar the king of Babylon within two full years more from off the neck of all the nations.’” And Jeremiah the prophet proceeded to go his way.
  • Jeremiah 29:1,2: And these are the words of the letter that Jeremiah the prophet sent from Jerusalem to the remainder of the older men of the exiled people and to the priests and to the prophets and to all the people, whom Nebuchadnezzar had carried into exile from Jerusalem to Babylon, 2 after Jeconiah the king and the lady and the court officials, the princes of Judah and Jerusalem, and the craftsmen and the builders of bulwarks had gone forth from Jerusalem.
  • Jeremiah 29:10–14: “For this is what Jehovah has said, ‘In accord with the fulfilling of seventy years at Babylon I shall turn my attention to YOU people, and I will establish toward YOU my good word in bringing YOU back to this place.’ 11 “‘For I myself well know the thoughts that I am thinking toward YOU,’ is the utterance of Jehovah, ‘thoughts of peace, and not of calamity, to give YOU a future and a hope. 12 And YOU will certainly call me and come and pray to me, and I will listen to YOU.’ 13 “‘And YOU will actually seek me and find [me], for YOU will search for me with all YOUR heart. 14 And I will let myself be found by YOU,’ is the utterance of Jehovah. ‘And I will gather YOUR body of captives and collect YOU together out of all the nations and out of all the places to which I have dispersed YOU,’ is the utterance of Jehovah. ‘And I will bring YOU back to the place from which I caused YOU to go into exile.’
  • Jeremiah 29:10 (NWT, 2013 revision): “For this is what Jehovah says, ‘When 70 years at Babylon are fulfilled, I will turn my attention to you, and I will make good my promise by bringing you back to this place.’
  • Most Bible translations support a rendering of “seventy years for Babylon”, including American Standard, Amplified, Basic English, Complete Jewish (“Bavel’s seventy years are over”), Contemporary English (“After Babylonia has been the strongest nation for seventy years”), Darby, English Standard, God’s Word (“Babylon’s 70 years are over”), Good News (“Babylonia’s seventy years are over”), Green’s Literal, Hebrew Names, Holman Christian Standard, Modern King James, New American Standard, New Century (“Babylon will be powerful for seventy years”), New International, New Life, New Revised Standard, Revised Standard, The Message (“Babylon’s seventy years are up”), Today’s New International, Weymouth New International, World English, Young’s Literal (“the fullness of Babylon – seventy years”).
  • Daniel 9:2–3: in the first year of his reigning I myself, Daniel, discerned by the books the number of the years concerning which the word of Jehovah had occurred to Jeremiah the prophet, for fulfilling the devastations of Jerusalem, [namely,] seventy years. 3 And I proceeded to set my face to Jehovah the [true] God, in order to seek [him] with prayer and with entreaties, with fasting and sackcloth and ashes.

When was Jerusalem destroyed?

Jerusalem was destroyed in 587 BCE,* after a siege of about thirty months# that began 10 Teveth 590 BCE. The city walls were breached on 9 Tammuz 587 BCE. Nebuchadnezzar entered the city on 7 Av 587 BCE, and the temple was destroyed on 10 Av 587 BCE. Gedaliah was killed during Tishri 587 BCE. Ezekiel learned of Jerusalem’s fall on 5 Teveth 587 BCE, during the Jews’ twelfth year of exile.
*Nebuchadnezzar’s 19th year including accession year (2 Kings 25:8; Jeremiah 25:12), which is his 18th year excluding accession year (Babylonian interpolation at Jeremiah 52:29, not to be confused with Jeremiah 32:1, which refers to Nebuchadnezzar’s 18th year including accession year during the siege). Various sources give the year as ‘586 or 587′, usually based on confusion about the different dating systems appearing in those verses. In other cases, the year is given as ‘587/6′ because the Nisan-based year spans parts of both years of the Gregorian calendar, with the fall of Jerusalem occurring in 587 BCE.
#Some sources suggest an 18-month siege; however, the writer of 2 Kings and Jeremiah used Tishri-based dating.
†The exile started prior to Nisan of 597 BCE, so the years of exile were counted from the year starting Nisan 598 BCE.

  • 2 Kings 25:1–10: And it came about in the ninth year of his being king, in the tenth month on the tenth day of the month, that Nebuchadnezzar the king of Babylon came, yes, he and all his military force, against Jerusalem and began camping against it and building against it a siege wall all around. 2 And the city came to be under siege until the eleventh year of King Zedekiah. 3 On the ninth day of the [fourth] month the famine was severe in the city, and there proved to be no bread for the people of the land. 4 And the city got to be breached, and all the men of war [fled] by night by the way of the gate between the double wall that is by the king’s garden, while the Chaldeans were all around against the city; and [the king] began to go in the direction of the Arabah. 5 And a military force of Chaldeans went chasing after the king, and they got to overtake him in the desert plains of Jericho; and all his own military force was scattered from his side. 6 Then they seized the king and brought him up to the king of Babylon at Riblah, that they might pronounce a judicial decision upon him. 7 And Zedekiah’s sons they slaughtered before his eyes, and Zedekiah’s eyes he blinded, after which he bound him with copper fetters and brought him to Babylon. 8 And in the fifth month on the seventh [day] of the month, that is to say, the nineteenth year of King Nebuchadnezzar the king of Babylon, Nebuzaradan the chief of the bodyguard, the servant of the king of Babylon, came to Jerusalem. 9 And he proceeded to burn the house of Jehovah and the king’s house and all the houses of Jerusalem; and the house of every great man he burned with fire. 10 And the walls of Jerusalem, all around, the entire military force of Chaldeans that were with the chief of the bodyguard pulled down.
  • 2 Kings 25:25: And it came about in the seventh month that Ishmael the son of Nethaniah the son of Elishama of the royal offspring came, and also ten men with him, and they got to strike down Gedaliah, so that he died, and also the Jews and the Chaldeans that happened to be with him in Mizpah.
  • Ezekiel 33:21: At length it occurred in the twelfth year, in the tenth [month], on the fifth day of the month of our exile, that there came to me the escaped one from Jerusalem, saying: “The city has been struck down!”

What would happen when the 70 years ended?

When seventy years ended, Babylon’s king would be ‘called to account’.

  • Jeremiah 25:12: “‘And it must occur that when seventy years have been fulfilled I shall call to account against the king of Babylon and against that nation,’ is the utterance of Jehovah, ‘their error, even against the land of the Chaldeans, and I will make it desolate wastes to time indefinite.

When was Babylon’s king ‘called to account’?

Babylon’s king was ‘called to account’ in 539 BCE.

  • Daniel 5:26–30: “This is the interpretation of the word: ME′NE, God has numbered [the days of] your kingdom and has finished it. 27 “TE′KEL, you have been weighed in the balances and have been found deficient. 28 “PE′RES, your kingdom has been divided and given to the Medes and the Persians.” 29 At that time Belshazzar commanded, and they clothed Daniel with purple, with a necklace of gold about his neck; and they heralded concerning him that he was to become the third ruler in the kingdom. 30 In that very night Belshazzar the Chaldean king was killed
  • Pay Attention to Daniel’s Prophecy, chap. 4 pp. 51–52 par. 12: Medo-Persia replaced the Babylonian Empire as dominant world power in 539 B.C.E. At 62 years of age, Darius the Mede became the first ruler of the conquered city of Babylon.

Could ‘calling to account’ apply to the new Medo-Persian king of Babylon after 539 BCE?

No. The Medes were included in the judgement of ‘all the kings’, and the judgement of Sheshach (Babylon) came after. The Persians arose from the rulers of Anshan, which was part of Elam, which was also specifically named.

  • Jeremiah 25:11: And all this land must become a devastated place, an object of astonishment, and these nations will have to serve the king of Babylon seventy years.”’
  • Jeremiah 25:15, 25–26: For this is what Jehovah the God of Israel said to me: “Take this cup of the wine of rage out of my hand, and you must make all the nations to whom I am sending you drink it. … 25 and all the kings of Zimri and all the kings of Elam and all the kings of the Medes; 26 and all the kings of the north who are near and far away, one after the other, and all the [other] kingdoms of the earth that are on the surface of the ground; and the king of Sheshach himself will drink after them.
  • Isaiah 21:2: There is a hard vision that has been told to me: The treacherous dealer is dealing treacherously, and the despoiler is despoiling. Go up, O E′lam! Lay siege, O Me′di·a! All sighing due to her I have caused to cease.
  • Daniel 5:31: and Darius the Mede himself received the kingdom, being about sixty-two years old.
  • The Watchtower, 1 March 1994, page 21: Sheshach is a symbolic name, a cryptogram, or code, for Babylon.

Does the Bible specify a Jewish exile of 70 years?

No. The Bible never mentions a ‘seventy-year exile’. Exile was a punishment for nations that refused to “serve Babylon” during its seventy years. “Jehovah’s word by the mouth of Jeremiah” was that the Jews would return home after “seventy years are completed for Babylon” (Jeremiah 29:10, New International Version). Jeremiah also said “nations will have to serve the king of Babylon seventy years” (Jeremiah 25:11), and then Babylon’s king would be ‘called to account’ (Jeremiah 25:12). The seventy years were fulfilled when “the royalty of Persia began to reign” and Babylon’s king was ‘called to account’ in 539 BCE, but the Jews were in Babylon until 538 BCE. While ‘Darius the Mede’ (Ugbaru in the Nabonidus Chronicle)* was governor in Babylon (late September until early October of 539 BCE) before Cyrus’ arrival, Daniel discerned that Babylon’s seventy years had ended and that the return of the Jews would follow.
* There is no historical record of ‘Darius the Mede’, but he can be logically identified as the governor in Babylon before the arrival of Cyrus. It is possible that the second-century BCE author of Daniel confused the name with that of other Persian rulers.

  • Jeremiah 27:11: “‘“‘And as for the nation that will bring its neck under the yoke of the king of Babylon and actually serve him, I will also let it rest upon its ground,’ is the utterance of Jehovah, ‘and it will certainly cultivate it and dwell in it.’”’”
  • Jeremiah 29:10 (NIV): This is what the LORD says: “When seventy years are completed for Babylon, I will come to you and fulfill my gracious promise to bring you back to this place.
  • Jeremiah 29:10 (NWT, 2013 revision): “For this is what Jehovah says, ‘When 70 years at Babylon are fulfilled, I will turn my attention to you, and I will make good my promise by bringing you back to this place.’
  • Daniel 9:1, 2: In the first year of Darius the son of Ahasuerus of the seed of the Medes, who had been made king over the kingdom of the Chaldeans; 2 in the first year of his reigning I myself, Daniel, discerned by the books the number of the years concerning which the word of Jehovah had occurred to Jeremiah the prophet, for fulfilling the devastations of Jerusalem, [namely,] seventy years.
  • 2 Chronicles 36:20–21: Furthermore, he carried off those remaining from the sword captive to Babylon, and they came to be servants to him and his sons until the royalty of Persia began to reign; 21 to fulfill Jehovah’s word by the mouth of Jeremiah, until the land had paid off its sabbaths. All the days of lying desolated it kept sabbath, to fulfill seventy years.
  • 2 Chronicles 36:20–21 (NIV): He carried into exile to Babylon the remnant, who escaped from the sword, and they became servants to him and his successors until the kingdom of Persia came to power. 21 The land enjoyed its sabbath rests; all the time of its desolation it rested, until the seventy years were completed in fulfillment of the word of the Lord spoken by Jeremiah.
  • Jeremiah 25:11: And all this land must become a devastated place, an object of astonishment, and these nations will have to serve the king of Babylon seventy years.”’

When did the Jews return from Babylon?

The Jews who responded to Cyrus’ decree to rebuild the temple in Jerusalem arrived in October of 538 BCE. (Many Jews did not leave Babylon at all.) Temple construction began in the second month (Iyyar) of Cyrus’ second regnal year (May 537 BCE), and the Jews were “in their cities” in the seventh month (Tishri) of the previous year (October 538 BCE). It is likely that the decree was made during Cyrus’ accession to the throne at the beginning of Nisan (April) of 538 BCE, allowing six months for the journey. The Bible says elsewhere that the journey can be completed in four months.

jews_return

Click for animation showing that the available information only supports 538 BCE for the year of the Jews’ return.

  • Ezra 3:1: When the seventh month arrived the sons of Israel were in [their] cities. And the people began to gather themselves as one man to Jerusalem.
  • Ezra 3:8: And in the second year of their coming to the house of the [true] God at Jerusalem, in the second month, Zerubbabel the son of Shealtiel and Jeshua the son of Jehozadak and the rest of their brothers, the priests and the Levites, and all those who had come out of the captivity to Jerusalem started; and they now put in positions the Levites from twenty years of age upward to act as supervisors over the work of the house of Jehovah.
  • Josephus’ Against Apion Book I, chapter 21: These accounts agree with the true histories in our books; for in them it is written that Nebuchadnezzar, in the eighteenth year of his reign, laid our temple desolate, and so it lay in that state of obscurity for fifty years; but that in the second year of the reign of Cyrus its foundations were laid, and it was finished again in the second year of Darius.
  • Insight on the Scriptures, volume 1, p. 568: Babylonian custom would place Cyrus’ first regnal year as running from Nisan of 538 to Nisan of 537 B.C.E.
  • Ezra 7:9: For on the first [day] of the first month he himself appointed the going up from Babylon, and on the first [day] of the fifth month he came to Jerusalem, according to the good hand of his God upon him.

For how long did the land pay its Sabbaths?

The land rested for forty-nine years, from the destruction of Jerusalem in 587 BCE until the return of Jews to Jerusalem in 538 BCE.

  • Leviticus 25:8: “‘And you must count for yourself seven sabbaths of years, seven times seven years, and the days of the seven sabbaths of years must amount to forty-nine years for you.
  • Leviticus 26:28, 34–35: I shall then have to walk in heated opposition to YOU, and I, yes, I, shall have to chastise YOU seven times for YOUR sins. … 34 “‘At that time the land will pay off its sabbaths all the days of its lying desolated, while YOU are in the land of YOUR enemies. At that time the land will keep sabbath, as it must repay its sabbaths. 35 All the days of its lying desolated it will keep sabbath, for the reason that it did not keep sabbath during YOUR sabbaths when YOU were dwelling upon it.
  • 2 Chronicles 36:20–21: Furthermore, he carried off those remaining from the sword captive to Babylon, and they came to be servants to him and his sons until the royalty of Persia began to reign; 21 to fulfill Jehovah’s word by the mouth of Jeremiah, until the land had paid off its sabbaths. All the days of lying desolated it kept sabbath, to fulfill seventy years.
  • 2 Chronicles 36:20–21 (NIV): He carried into exile to Babylon the remnant, who escaped from the sword, and they became servants to him and his successors until the kingdom of Persia came to power. 21 The land enjoyed its sabbath rests; all the time of its desolation it rested, until the seventy years were completed in fulfillment of the word of the Lord spoken by Jeremiah.

jerusalem_temple

Was Egypt made desolate for forty years by Nebuchadnezzar?

No. Neither Nebuchadnezzar nor Babylon is mentioned in the pronouncement about Egypt being made desolate for forty years at Ezekiel 29:1–16. Verse 17 introduces a separate pronouncement made seventeen years later. There is no evidence that the entire population of Egypt was ever taken into exile, but if it were, it would be more likely to occur during the Persian period while there was no Pharaoh in Egypt. However, it is more likely that the ‘forty years’ referred to the reign of Amasis II after he defeated the previous Pharaoah, Apries (Hophra). Amasis ruled from 570 BCE until 526 BCE. After Amasis took the throne, Apries stood as a rival, but was finally killed in 567 BCE. The uncontested portion of Amasis’ reign was forty years. The reign of Amasis II was actually prosperous, but as far as Hophra and his lineage was concerned, Egypt was ‘destroyed’. Additionally, the number 40 is frequently used idiomatically in the Bible to mean ‘a long time’. (Even within the context of the biblical narrative, it is possible that the foretold desolation of Egypt did not eventuate, in a similar manner to Jonah’s unfulfilled warning to Nineveh.)

  • Ezekiel 29:1, 12–13: In the tenth year, in the tenth [month], on the twelfth [day] of the month, the word of Jehovah occurred to me, saying: … 12 And I will make the land of Egypt a desolate waste in the midst of desolated lands; and its own cities will become a desolate waste in the very midst of devastated cities for forty years; and I will scatter the Egyptians among the nations and disperse them among the lands.” 13 “‘For this is what the Sovereign Lord Jehovah has said: “At the end of forty years I shall collect the Egyptians together out of the peoples among whom they will have been scattered,
  • Ezekiel 29:17: Now it came about in the twenty-seventh year, in the first [month], on the first [day] of the month, that the word of Jehovah occurred to me, saying:
  • Jeremiah 44:30: This is what Jehovah has said: “Here I am giving Phar′aoh Hoph′ra, the king of Egypt, into the hand of his enemies and into the hand of those seeking for his soul, just as I have given Zed·e·ki′ah the king of Judah into the hand of Neb·u·chad·rez′zar the king of Babylon, his enemy and the one seeking for his soul.”’”
  • Insight on the Scriptures, volume 1, p. 1140: Hophra’s troops revolted against him and set up Ahmose II (Amasis) as rival king. Even then, Hophra was so arrogant that he “supposed that not even a god could depose him from his throne.” However, he was taken prisoner and finally was killed by being strangled.
  • Insight on the Scriptures, volume 1, p. 698: At Ezekiel 29:1–16 a desolation of Egypt is foretold, due to last 40 years. … secular history provides no clear evidence of the prophecy’s fulfillment, … Egypt later supported Babylon against the rising power of Medo-Persia. But by 525 B.C.E., the land was subjugated by Cambyses II, son of Cyrus the Great, and thereby came under Persian imperial rule.
  • The Watchtower, 1 November 1959, p. 667: during the days of Pharaoh Psammetichus III, the Persian King Cambyses of the fourth world power had conquered Egypt and had carried home in triumph the conquered Egyptian gods, “their molten images.”
  • Jonah 4:11: And, for my part, ought I not to feel sorry for Nineveh the great city, in which there exist more than one hundred and twenty thousand men who do not at all know the difference between their right hand and their left, besides many domestic animals?”

In what way was Tyre ‘forgotten’ for 70 years?

Tyre was one of the nations that was subject to Babylon for seventy years. Tyre was a major trading partner of various cities under Assyrian control, particularly Harran, which was conquered by the Babylonians in 609 BCE, putting an end to the Assyrian empire.

  • Isaiah 23:15: And it must occur in that day that Tyre must be forgotten seventy years, the same as the days of one king. At the end of seventy years it will happen to Tyre as in the song of a prostitute:
  • Jeremiah 25:11, 22: And all this land must become a devastated place, an object of astonishment, and these nations will have to serve the king of Babylon seventy years.”’ … 22 and all the kings of Tyre and all the kings of Sidon and the kings of the island that is in the region of the sea;
  • Jeremiah 27:1–3: In the beginning of the kingdom of Jehoiakim the son of Josiah, the king of Judah, this word occurred to Jeremiah from Jehovah, saying: 2 “This is what Jehovah has said to me, ‘Make for yourself bands and yoke bars, and you must put them upon your neck. 3 And you must send them to the king of Edom and to the king of Moab and to the king of the sons of Ammon and to the king of Tyre and to the king of Sidon by the hand of the messengers who are coming to Jerusalem to Zedekiah the king of Judah.
  • Ezekiel 27:23: Ha′ran and Can′neh and E′den, the traders of She′ba, As′shur [and] Chil′mad were your traders.
  • Isaiah’s Prophecy—Light for All Mankind, volume 1, chap. 19 p. 253: Jehovah, through Jeremiah, includes Tyre among the nations that will be singled out to drink the wine of His rage. He says: “These nations will have to serve the king of Babylon seventy years.” (Jeremiah 25:8–17, 22, 27) True, the island-city of Tyre is not subject to Babylon for a full 70 years, since the Babylonian Empire falls in 539 B.C.E. Evidently, the 70 years represents the period of Babylonia’s greatest domination—when the Babylonian royal dynasty boasts of having lifted its throne even above “the stars of God.” (Isaiah 14:13)

When were Zechariah’s 70 years?

The period of 70 years mentioned by Zechariah is not the same period of time as Babylon’s 70 years. Although Babylon’s 70 years ended when Babylon was ‘called to account’ in 539 BCE, the period described by Zechariah was still ongoing in the 2nd year of Darius (520 BCE). In that year, Zechariah described a vision in which he heard an angel use an expression of frustration regarding a period of denunciation that was still having an effect on Jerusalem and the cities of Judah. In the 9th month of Darius’ 4th year (December 518 BCE), Zechariah is asked whether annual fasting should still be observed. In his response, he indicates that the fasts held in the 5th and 7th months (August and October) had been observed for 70 years, including the fasts that had been held earlier that year, which places the first year of fasting in 587 BCE.

  • Zechariah 1:7–8, 11–12: On the twenty-fourth day of the eleventh month, that is, the month Sheʹbat, in the second year of Da·riʹus, the word of Jehovah occurred to Zech·a·riʹah the son of Ber·e·chiʹah the son of Idʹdo the prophet, saying: 8I saw [in] the night, and, look! a man riding on a red horse, and he was standing still among the myrtle trees that were in the deep place; and behind him there were horses red, bright red, and white.” … 11 And they proceeded to answer the angel of Jehovah who was standing among the myrtle trees and to say: “We have walked about in the earth, and, look! the whole earth is sitting still and having no disturbance.” 12 So the angel of Jehovah answered and said: “O Jehovah of armies, how long will you yourself not show mercy to Jerusalem and to the cities of Judah, whom you have denounced these seventy years?”
  • Zechariah 1:8 (NIV): During the night I had a vision, and there before me was a man mounted on a red horse. He was standing among the myrtle trees in a ravine. Behind him were red, brown and white horses.
  • Zechariah 7:1–5: And in the fourth year of King Da·riʹus, the word of Jehovah came to Zech·a·riʹah on the fourth day of the ninth month, that is, the month of Chisʹlev. 2The people of Bethʹel sent Shar·eʹzer and Reʹgem-melʹech and his men to beg for the favor of Jehovah, 3 saying to the priests of the house of Jehovah of armies and to the prophets: “Should I weep in the fifth month and abstain from food, as I have done for so many years?” 4 The word of Jehovah of armies again came to me, saying: 5 “Say to all the people of the land and to the priests, ‘When you fasted and wailed in the fifth month and in the seventh month for 70 years, did you really fast for me?

When were the ‘Gentile Times’?

The “gentile times” or “appointed times of the nations” was a period of “forty-two months” (three-and-a-half years) during which Jerusalem would be “trampled on by the nations”. It refers to the period from the Roman response to the Jewish rebellion in 66 CE, culminating in Jerusalem’s destruction in 70 CE. The original grammar of Luke 21:24 and the broader context both indicate that it referred to a period that had not yet started in Jesus’ time. The period is analogous to an earlier “time of the end” mentioned in the book of Daniel, in reference to the assault on Jerusalem from 168 BCE until 165 BCE, where a previous “disgusting thing that causes desolation” referred to Greek worship imposed by Antiochus IV (the ‘king of the north’).* The analogy was intended to serve as a signal to flee Jerusalem when a revolt in 66 CE—also sparked by Greek worship—resulted in another military campaign.
* For more information about the overall theme of the book of Daniel, see Daniel’s dreams and visions.

  • Luke 21:20–24: “Furthermore, when YOU see Jerusalem surrounded by encamped armies, then know that the desolating of her has drawn near. 21 Then let those in Ju·deʹa begin fleeing to the mountains, and let those in the midst of her withdraw, and let those in the country places not enter into her; 22 because these are days for meting out justice, that all the things written may be fulfilled. 23 Woe to the pregnant women and the ones suckling a baby in those days! For there will be great necessity upon the land and wrath on this people; 24 and they will fall by the edge of the sword and be led captive into all the nations; and Jerusalem will be trampled on by the nations, until the appointed times of the nations are fulfilled.
  • Revelation 11:2: But as for the courtyard that is outside the temple [sanctuary], cast it clear out and do not measure it, because it has been given to the nations, and they will trample the holy city underfoot for forty-two months.
  • Matthew 24:15, 16: “Therefore, when YOU catch sight of the disgusting thing that causes desolation, as spoken of through Daniel the prophet, standing in a holy place, (let the reader use discernment,) 16then let those in Ju·deʹa begin fleeing to the mountains.
  • Mark 13:14: “However, when YOU catch sight of the disgusting thing that causes desolation standing where it ought not (let the reader use discernment), then let those in Ju·deʹa begin fleeing to the mountains.
  • Daniel 11:31: And there will be arms that will stand up, proceeding from him; and they will actually profane the sanctuary, the fortress, and remove the constant [feature]. “And they will certainly put in place the disgusting thing that is causing desolation.
  • Daniel 11:40, 41a: “And in the time of [the] end the king of the south will engage with him in a pushing, and against him the king of the north will storm with chariots and with horsemen and with many ships; and he will certainly enter into the lands and flood over and pass through. 41He will also actually enter into the land of the Decoration, and many lands will be made to stumble.
  • Insight on the Scriptures, volume 2, p. 44–45: in the year 168 B.C.E., Syrian King Antiochus IV (Epiphanes), in his attempt to Hellenize completely the Jews, dedicated Jerusalem’s temple to Zeus (Jupiter) and profaned the altar by an unclean sacrifice. … This led to the Maccabean (or Hasmonaean) revolt. After a three-year struggle, Judas Maccabaeus gained control of the city and temple and rededicated Jehovah’s altar to true worship on the anniversary of its profanation, Chislev 25, 165 B.C.E.
  • Insight on the Scriptures, volume 1, p. 635: In 66 C.E. pagan Roman armies surrounded “the holy city” Jerusalem, now the center of Jewish revolt against Rome. Thus, the ‘causing of desolation’ by the disgusting thing was imminent, and so this was the final signal for discerning Christians to ‘flee to the mountains.’ (Mt 4:5; 27:53; 24:15, 16; Lu 19:43, 44; 21:20-22) Following their flight, the desolation of the city and nation occurred, Jerusalem being destroyed in the year 70 C.E.
  • Josephus’ Wars of the Jews Book 2, chapter 14: at the same time began the war, in the twelfth year of the reign of Nero, and the seventeenth of the reign of Agrippa, in the month of Artemisins [April/May]. Now the occasion of this war was by no means proportionable to those heavy calamities which it brought upon us. For the Jews that dwelt at Cesarea had a synagogue near the place, whose owner was a certain Cesarean Greek: … Now on the next day, which was the seventh day of the week, when the Jews were crowding apace to their synagogue, a certain man of Cesarea, of a seditious temper, got an earthen vessel, and set it with the bottom upward, at the entrance of that synagogue, and sacrificed birds. This thing provoked the Jews to an incurable degree, because their laws were affronted, and the place was polluted. Whereupon the sober and moderate part of the Jews thought it proper to have recourse to their governors again, while the seditious part, and such as were in the fervor of their youth, were vehemently inflamed to fight. … Moreover, as to the citizens of Jerusalem, although they took this matter very ill, yet did they restrain their passion; but Florus acted herein as if he had been hired, and blew up the war into a flame, and sent some to take seventeen talents out of the sacred treasure, and pretended that Caesar wanted them. … Yet was not he made ashamed hereby of his love of money, but was more enraged, and provoked to get still more; and instead of coming to Cesarea, as he ought to have done, and quenching the flame of war, which was beginning thence, and so taking away the occasion of any disturbances, on which account it was that he had received a reward, he marched hastily with an army of horsemen and footmen against Jerusalem, that he might gain his will by the arms of the Romans, and might, by his terror, and by his threatenings, bring the city into subjection.

Did Charles Taze Russell make accurate predictions about 1914?

No. Russell claimed that the “time of the end” began in 1799, that Jesus’ presence began in 1874, and that Jesus began ruling in 1878; Russell predicted that Armageddon would begin suddenly, in or shortly after October of 1914. World War I began after the assassination of Archduke Ferdinand on 28 June 1914. Australia, Austria, Belgium, Britain, France, Germany, Hungary, Japan, Luxembourg, Montenegro, New Zealand, Russia, Serbia and South Africa were at war prior to October. World War I did not ‘suddenly’ break out in an otherwise peaceful world, but was based on decades of complex tensions across Europe, including the First (1912–1913) and Second (1913) Balkan Wars. Though the Watch Tower Society has published material about many wars, it has not mentioned the Balkan Wars for at least the last eighty-four years. Instead, it claims that the Yugoslavian conflict in the 1990s began with World War I.
For more information about how the Watch Tower Society has lied about what it said would happen in 1914, see http://www.jwfacts.com/watchtower/failed-1914-predictions.php.

  • Studies in the Scriptures Volume III (Thy Kingdom Come), page 23: The “Time of the End,” a period of one hundred and fifteen (115) years, from A.D. 1799 to A.D. 1914, is particularly marked in the Scriptures.
  • Zion’s Watch Tower, 15 July 1894, page 226: But bear in mind that the end of 1914 is not the date for the beginning, but for the end of the time of trouble.
  • Studies in the Scriptures Volume III (Thy Kingdom Come), page 239: Our Lord’s presence as Bridegroom and Reaper was recognized during the first three and a half years, from A. D. 1874 to A. D. 1878. … The year A. D. 1878, … clearly marks the time for the actual assuming of power as King of kings, by our present, spiritual, invisible Lord—the time of his taking to himself his great power to reign, which in the prophecy is closely associated with the resurrection of his faithful, and the beginning of the trouble and wrath upon the nations.
  • The Watch Tower, 15 May 1911, page 146: Our readers know that for some years we have been expecting this Age to close with an awful time of trouble, and we expect it to break out with suddenness and force not long after October, 1914.
  • Awake!, 8 November 1994, page 4: When battles broke out in Yugoslavia in June 1991, it was not surprising that many people remembered the shots fired in Sarajevo in June 1914. … The conflicts are not new. At the very start of this century, the Balkan Peninsula was spoken of as “the restless corner of Europe.” Jugoslavien—Ett land i upplösning says: “It is a question of the disintegration of a union where tension has been growing for a very long time. In actual fact, the conflicts were already there when the Kingdom of Serbia, Croatia and Slovenia [Yugoslavia’s former name] was created at the end of World War I.” Some historical background will help us to see how present-day conflicts go back to World War I.
  • Wikipedia: List of Wars 1800–1899, List of Wars 1900–1944, Causes of World War I, First Balkan War, Second Balkan War, Timeline of World War I.

Contents

Got a different question about 607 BCE? Leave a comment.

Scripture quotations, unless otherwise stated, are from the New World Translation of the Holy Scriptures—with References Copyright ©1984 Watch Tower Bible & Tract Society.
Awake!, Isaiah’s Prophecy—Light for all Mankind, Pay Attention to Daniel’s Prophecy, The Watchtower, Insight on the Scriptures Copyright © Watch Tower Bible & Tract Society.

New International Version Copyright ©2011 Biblica (International Bible Society).

Copyright ©2009–2016 Jeffro. All Rights Reserved.

4 thoughts on “607 for Beginners

  1. An excellent easy to understand description of how Jehovah’s Witnesses have it so wrong.
    But how many even know the extent of how wrong they are.
    The Governing Body is aware that 607 is not the correct date for the destruction of Jerusalem. Search for Max Hatton or Carl Johnson, all wrote to the Society with genuine motives. But they cannot ever change it even though the archaeological evidence is bomb proof. Without 607 there is no 2520years to 1914.

    Thanks for this keep up the good work.

  2. Gedalija je ubiven 582 godine p.n.e.u 23 godini navuhodonozoreve vladavine a to je bilo trece izganstvo.jer dogadjaji u Mipsu nisu mogli da se dese za samo nekoliko meseci jer je to nemoguce

    ED: My best guess at translation: “Gedaliah was murdered in 582 BCE, in Nebuchadnezzar’s 23rd year, which was the year of the third exile. It is impossible for the events in Jeremiah about Mizpah to occur within only a few months.”

    • From what I can tell, you’re saying that there would not be sufficient time for the events surrounding Gedaliah’s death and the subsequent escape of Jews to Egypt to occur in the same year as the temple’s destruction, and you are therefore suggesting that those events must have occurred in 582 BCE instead, in connection with the ‘third exile’ (that is, the one referenced at Jeremiah 52:30).

      Whilst I am not convinced that it is impossible for Gedaliah to have been killed in the same year as the temple’s destruction, I am also aware of this alternative viewpoint. However, for the purpose of these articles, I simply present what the Bible says on the matter. The Jewish tradition is that Gedaliah was killed in the seventh month of the same year as the temple’s destruction, which was the basis for the fasts held in the seventh month (Zechariah 7:5). But it is also possible that the events surrounding Gedaliah’s death could have covered a longer period.

      Because the ’70 years’ was a period during which nations were subject to Babylon rather than a period of Jewish exile, the timing of the events related to Gedaliah is not directly relevant to Babylon’s 70 years.

  3. Great stuff keep it coming! compare Isaiah 55;11 Joshua 21;45 and Joshua 23;14 for truth in foretelling and the complete nonsense of the Watchtower’s “predictions”

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